A page a day

Life on California's beautiful Central Coast

Structures of note

Here are a few things I noticed while walking around in Ouray today.

House perched on a hilltop.

House perched on a hilltop.

This is a little Swiss style hiking hut at the Box Canyon park. If they really want to be like Switzerland here, they need to get on it with the Toblerone and hot chocolate!

This is a little Swiss style hiking hut at the Box Canyon park. If they really want to be like Switzerland here, they need to get on it with the Toblerone and hot chocolate!

All American house down below the trail.

All American house down below the trail.

Here’s something interesting. Remember the high wire bridge I went over yesterday on the Perimeter Trail? Well, turns out that bridge has been there since.. wait for it ..

1900.

1900.

Wow. It was originally put up there to use for access to a water pipeline. You could actually see it if you looked up in the Box Canyon.

Looking up at the high bridge.

Looking up at the high bridge.

 I also took the time to get a little more information about the Great Unconformity that I mentioned yesterday. As I thought, it was a billion year gap in the geologic record. According to the helpful sign: During the Precambrian era, Ouray was covered by a shallow sea. Sand and clay were put down in horizontal layers and became sandstone over time.

When the mountains started to rise, that sandstone was buried, compressed and heated, and eventually tilted vertically. This is what is called the Uncompaghre Formation.

Then, approximately 1 billion years passed before the seas covered the area again and deposited more layers. “These horizontal layers were then transformed into the sandstone and shale of the Elbert Formation seen just above the vertical rock layers. It is this angular discordance, representing a billion year gap in the geologic record, that is called the ‘Great Unconformity.'” People come here from all over to see it.

This is what they are talking about.

This is what they are talking about.

This is perhaps only interesting because we are reading some of John McPhee’s work on geology in preparation for our visit to Wyoming. But nevertheless, perhaps you learned a little bit about rocks.

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